#uklibchat Summary – Digital Libraries – 6 March 2014

#uklibchat

On 6 March 2014, we talked about digital libraries in their many forms – what exactly they are, what challenges and opportunities they offer our profession, and how library customers use them.

The full archive of tweets from this chat is available here.

Here’s a summary of the discussion:

Q1: What do you think a digital library is?

This is quite a tough question. Some thoughts were:

  • @LAICDGroup: A digital library is any library that offers access to its resources in digital form, online.
  • @archinva: a digital library is an organized collection of materials made available in digital format, I think
  • @LibrarySherpa: IMO, a contained and managed collection of resources and/or data which can only be accessed via computer or device.

@SimonXIX’s feature blog for this chat argued that Netflix and Itunes were basically digital libraries, but weren’t considered as such in LIS for cultural and legal reasons. This sparked debate…

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#uklibchat summary, on reading – 1st April 2014

#uklibchat

A summary of our April chat on reading can be found below.  A full archive of the chat can be found at

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AgyKBIR780pOdFJHOTlrQXo1VFRwY0JpOXpkZ0ZKN2c#gid=0

1. How much of your job is about encouraging reading?

  • Many librarians, particularly those in higher education, said that they don’t tend to promote reading much in their job although some had small “leisure” collections for students
  • Those working in other environments e.g. school libraries did a lot more reader development work
  • The question of what “reading” meant in this context was discussed: did it apply to reading on websites for example?
  • @jamesatkinson81 said “I don’t really feel I encourage reading, more facilitate it”

2. Do you have any suggestions for how to reach groups who don’t read much?

Suggestions made by several users included:

  • More accessible books such as graphic novels, manga, quick reads, non-fiction, film/TV tie-ins were highlighted by many contributors
  • Using “non-book” things to…

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“Going Old School” Part 1: Taking a Cataloging and Classification Course

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Cataloging Post

B/W Image credit: Wikimedia Commons

We all hear it nowadays. The LIS profession is becoming more and more tech-centric, therefore, curricula and resources have become more devoted to the evolving digital information age. Courses are being offered in networking administration, web design, and digital libraries and even mobile application development. Library students are conquering digital technology and harnessing some amazing skills, like learning to code. They’re also having to consider whether to jump wholeheartedly on the digital band wagon or be left behind in the prehistoric age of card catalogs and dusty book jackets.

But wait! Hold steady for just a moment before taking the dive. Think twice before completely avoiding library courses that have been fundamental to the library profession.

In Part 1 of the series, “Going Old School”, we invite you to take a moment and weigh the benefits of signing up for one of two well-known library…

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